Localization of the ‘World Wide Web’

Localization of the ‘World Wide Web’

Localization of the web is progressing at full speed. Online marketing and advertising, just like search results in general, are increasingly targeted to specific regions, both linguistic and geographic regions. I moved from The Netherlands to Boston three months ago, and the online experience is simply completely different – not just because the average internet speed is, interestingly enough, significantly slower in the US. When you are visiting another country you can get an idea of the differences, but when you change your country settings in all your accounts, the experience changes even more. Over the next few years more content and advertising will become local, even on the ‘world wide web’. We may be connected in a technological sense, through those mysterious cables on our ocean floors, but time zones, languages, cultural norms, geographic and environmental factors all influence human behavior. A sense of community is more important than ever for many people. Google’s Eric Schmidt wrote in his book ‘The New Digital Age‘ that the web could one day be like air space, where countries actively govern their own web and may get involved in international cyber wars and conflicts of interest. Of course, this is already the case to a large extent. In terms of marketing and customer service, however, this development can only mean that translation and localization will matter more than ever. It is the number one reason that translation is seeing the biggest job growth, according to Careerbuilder. Globalization and localization often go hand-in-hand, however contrary that may seem. Both large cooperations and small businesses need to explore ways to connect with their international...
Don’t hesitate to translate your marketing message

Don’t hesitate to translate your marketing message

It can be intimidating to deliver your marketing message to other languages and cultures. You’ve worked hard to create a consistent, authentic identity – how do you even begin to translate your marketing message? How do you keep it up-to-date? Are you going to have to completely change your company’s strategy abroad? Translation and localization is not the hard part. It’s finding your voice and putting yourself out there – you’ve already done that! There are no shortcuts to putting yourself out there. A Twitter user proudly announced today that it would ‘promote your book to 157.000+ followers’. It sounds great, however, it’s probably not very effective. Many people want to be heard, they want their product or service to stand out. Many people also don’t want to do the work it takes. If you’ve worked hard to establish not only a product or service but also a voice, identity and a story, then the translation and localization of your marketing will be smooth and simple. All you have to do is give your language service provider a sneak peak behind the scenes of your company. Textcase finds a way to preserve your company identity while translating and localizing your marketing for another culture and language. We take our time to understand your business goals, we give free advice and we follow up to make sure you succeed. Read more about translating your marketing message and taking your...

Breaking the language barrier

New York City teenager Tim Doner speaks more than 20 languages. When he is invited by media outlets to discuss his impressive ability to learn languages, it becomes clear that most people are only interested in hearing Chinese tongue twisters and other ‘exotic’ sounds. Tim’s impressive talk, see below, shows that there are no shortcuts to getting to know other languages and cultures. He also explains that we can translate and carry little travel dictionaries around all we want, but that true meaning is a completely different layer that takes lots of time and effort to...
The Most Important Languages

The Most Important Languages

Yesterday we published a blog about how AdWords can be a great way to test the market potential of foreign countries. One of the questions it didn’t answer was which languages are the most important. A few weeks ago, The Economist wrote about the most important languages. Scholars from various universities looked at the connections between languages and how many celebrities speak a certain language. They looked at Wikipedia editors, Twitter users and book translations. The results do not imply that these are the most important languages for business, but they do provide a unique insight into international communications. Russian connects languages from Asia to the Middle East, Chinese connects many Asian languages. Hindi and Arabic also played a big role. To find out which languages are most important from a commercial perspective, read our blog Which Languages Matter Most...
Internationalization with AdWords

Internationalization with AdWords

You can’t start internationalizing your business before you’ve tested the waters. Many companies invest in multilingual AdWords campaigns to assess the amount of interest in their services in a particular country and to connect with potential customers. They do so long before they start offering their service or product. Testing international markets with AdWords campaigns has proven to be an effective technique. The costs depend on your niche market and the competition in a certain region. What exactly do you need to get started? A successful existing AdWords campaign You’ll only need adjust it for internationalization. You can probably leave parts of your AdWords strategy out, focus solely on getting your name out there and connecting with potential customers. A Google Partner localization agency / translation agency Find a localization agency that thoroughly reviews your existing AdWords campaigns, that understands your goals and that thinks with you to make your AdWords effective in the target countries. Marketing and translation increasingly overlap: there is an urgent need for language professionals who understand online marketing and commercial communications. A few excellent landing pages Someone clicked on your German advertisement. Congratulations! Now you need to have a page that offers them what they are looking for: information, a way to sign up, a way to stay in touch, anything that suits your goals. These texts are obviously written in superb German and completely customized for your target customer. After some time, you can assess the level of interest and the potential the region has for your business. Internationalization with AdWords is probably one of the most controlled and affordable ways to make your first steps...
Internationalization as a Growth Strategy

Internationalization as a Growth Strategy

Could internationalization be the way for your business to grow? New markets are usually within reach and it doesn’t have to be an expensive undertaking. As a marketing-oriented translation agency, we work with many businesses – small and large – to offer their service or product in other countries. Our Project Managers roughly take the following steps in our localization and translation services: * Familiarize with the existing marketing strategy. * Discuss targets and time frames. * Consult with both marketers and linguists who live in the targeted countries. * Identify challenges or changes that need to be made to the marketing strategy. * Agree on which changes can be made. * Start translation and localization process. * Solve any unexpected challenges or act on new ideas and improvements. * Make sure the new marketing texts resonate with the target audience. * Monitor results. Textcase is practicing what it’s preaching: we are opening up our brand new Boston office March 1st 2015. It is our very first office in North America and because of this experience we understand the challenges that arise in offering a service or product in a foreign region. Whether you have a specific plan in place or you’re simply considering internationalization as a possible growth strategy, don’t hesitate to contact us. We look forward to sharing our experiences, solving problems, seeking out possibilities for multi-lingual customer service and much, much...

Connotations of Brands and Product Names

‘Fellatio’, ‘pancake’ and ‘waxed mare’: it might be hard to believe, but this is what some product names actually mean in other languages. Many businesses don’t even consider the fact that something as simple as the pronunciation of a product name in a foreign language may conjure up strange and unwanted associations that are sure to raise eyebrows. Introducing product names unchecked and unmodified in another country may therefore lead to extremely painful translation mix-ups. An article from the Wall Street Journal illustrates just how important transliteration may be when translating business texts and product names. The article describes how IKEA in Thailand has its product names checked, and where necessary transliterated by a complete team of interpreters and translators. With good reason, apparently. Many businesses that spread their wings across their domestic borders make mistakes when it comes to product translations. For instance, IKEA learned that the name of one of its beds (Redalen) bears a striking resemblance to the Thai word for oral sex. The pronunciation of the plant pot ‘Jättekul’ also had sexual connotations in Thai. But IKEA is not by far the only company that had incorrectly translated its product names (or rather: not translated them at all). In China, Bing, the name of Microsoft’s search engine, was changed to ‘bi ying’. Depending on the pronunciation, ‘Bing’ in Chinese refers to pancakes and diseases. And as early as 1927, it became clear that rendering ‘Coca Cola’ phonetically in Chinese characters led to words that refer to a waxed mare. Coca Cola subsequently changed the Chinese spelling of its brand, in order to prevent any unwanted...
The Effects of Poor AdWords Translations

The Effects of Poor AdWords Translations

When developing an efficient, multilingual website, reaching the right target audience is paramount. To achieve this, advertising online with Google AdWords is always a sure way to add strength to your organic visibility. You probably already have an AdWords campaign and think that all you need to do is translate it when you go international. However, this is easier said than done. More often than not, a great deal of money is spent on irrelevant keywords and incorrect targeting, leaving you with no positive results whatsoever. In this blog I’ll explain the pitfalls when translating AdWords campaigns. Global Market Finder A good first step is finding out the potential of the product or service you want to advertise. A very interesting tool is the Global Market Finder, which enables you to enter very specific keywords to see which other search terms people fill in, for example in one of the other 56 languages. When you combine Global Market Finder with your own AdWords account, it displays estimates and recommended bid together with the competitive results for every keyword in your specific target market. This allows you to find out which search terms will find your products or services in the specific country. The right keywords In every language and in every country, different ways are used to search for products. That’s why it’s always a good idea to first perform a local keyword analysis. You can do this with the AdWords Keyword Planner. Here you can look for ideas for keywords and ad groups, gain access to historical statistics, view the potential performance of a list of keywords and...

Google Skipped Persian Classes

Sadly, our beloved US Market intern Shabnam is leaving Textcase. After 6 months of hard work, she’ll continue to finish her degree at university. Since she is originally from Iran, I wanted to say good bye in her mother language: Persian. However, instead of asking one of our own translators, I decided to take Google Translate for a spin. Even though Textcase is an official Google Partner thanks to our excellence in Google AdWords, we would never recommend any company to translate their website, documents or mobile application using Google Translate. To support this statement, let’s go back to my little conversion with Shabnam. As I said, I wanted to say good bye to Shabnam. The exact sentence I formulated was ‘see you later’. Since I didn’t want to be too hard on Google, I changed the expression to a full sentence. What I eventually fed into Google’s machine was ‘I will see you later’. It resulted into the following: من شما را بعدا مراجعه کنید Happy as a child that just learned his first word, I showed the above to Shabnam. As soon as she started to laugh I knew what happened. The Persian sentence provided by Google didn’t make any sense at all: “I you come back later” The ‘come back later’ part is even considered to be a formal way of dismissing someone who interrupts you while you’re on the phone. So Google has a hard time translating this basic and actually very common phrase. However, maybe I confused Google by providing a full sentence, while I should have stuck with the shorter expression: ‘see you’. Unsurprisingly,...

Textcase in Dublin: LPMC-diploma, LocWorld and compliments from Google

Earlier this month I earned my Localization Project Management Certification (LPMC) in Dublin. It’s a relevant course, especially because of the importance of project management as a component of translation, optimisation and localization at Textcase. Following the intense two-day course, the city also hosted the Localization World conference. All in all, an inspiring week, brimming with new knowledge, new contacts and applicable ideas. The course was organised by the Localization Institute. The classroom workshop component was preceded by a number of weeks of online self-study. My fellow students were project managers both on the buyer side and colleagues from other translation agencies. We completed a number of case-based group assignments that covered topics such as project planning, agile methods, risk management and quality assurance. We were also treated to extremely interesting presentations by industry leaders, including Vincent Gadani, Localization Manager at Microsoft and Tony O’Dowd, CEO of KantanMT. Our team in Utrecht discussed a number of project management Best Practices, such as the Localization Maturity Model, Work Breakdown Structures and Risk Breakdown Structures. At our weekly Textcase meeting, which we refer to as a ‘huddle’, we share expertise and insights and set out plans to further improve our work. Google: AdWords translation During my stay in Dublin, I also visited the European Google head office to meet up with my former colleagues and exchange ideas. The people at Google were very impressed with Textcase’s Google Partner status (the only translation agency in The Netherlands to have been awarded this status) and our AdWords translation practices: unique in the globalising online marketing field! Read more on the complexities of AdWords...

The Benefits of Small Translation Agencies

Whether you’re looking to have a book or document translated, choosing the right language service provider is key. Many clients such as authors, publishers, and corporations believe that larger translation agencies will generally provide better translations than smaller firms. But is that really the case? Brian McConnell, a writer for the Globalization & Localization Association, wrote an impressive article in which he highlights the following: “I generally recommend that customers avoid the big three companies unless they are going to generate six to seven figure annual budgets. The reason isn’t that the big translation companies are bad, it’s just that their incentive is to focus on large accounts or accounts that might grow quickly. You’ll get more attention and better service from small and mid-sized companies, and as noted above, new tools make it straightforward to manage multiple providers, and to do much of the project management yourself.” At Textcase, we welcome Mr. McConnell’s conclusion and would like to illustrate the advantages of choosing a small translation agency. There are four elements that we would like to highlight here, elements that we believe benefit both private clients and companies. 1.    Customer service/more attention and higher service level The main advantage of choosing smaller translation agencies is the superior level of customer service they provide. In today’s market, clients place value not only the products and services they receive, but also look for more personal contact in terms of rapport, accommodating their needs, and offering solutions to any potential problems. Consequently, communication and interaction with our clients is a vital part of being a project manager at Textcase. Each client is...

10 SEO Tips for Website Translations

In a previous blog, I discussed domain name selection when creating a multi-lingual website. This time I will take a closer look at the SEO structure that is required for a successful international website. The ten most important SEO translation tips that should be taken into consideration when translating websites are given below. SEO translation tip 1: Define and translate your principal keywords As a website owner, you have become more than familiar with the importance of the right keywords by now. But what about other languages? Don’t translate your keywords literally, but instead, make sure you know what the most popular search terms are in the country where you are planning to launch your website. A helpful tool is the AdWords keyword planner; use it to check keywords in specific geographic areas and to see potentially interesting alternatives. SEO translation tip 2:  Optimize your keyword density A proper ‘keyword density’ is essential for all websites. Keyword density is the percentage of times a keyword appears on a web page compared to the total number of words on that page. First, define the keywords you want to lead to your site (tip 1) and then make sure that these keywords have a density of between 2% and 5%. No higher and no lower, because Google has penalty filters in place for sites that abuse this strategy. SEO translation tip 3: Translate meta and title tags Meta and title tags remain one of the principal factors for Google in terms of ranking. Make sure that your tags match the content of the page and the page URL. You will miss out...

From Translation To Localization

The advantages of localization today go beyond opening up national markets. Imagine you earn money by selling your product locally. You have a product description in place, a website, webshop, marketing materials and more. Your business is growing and you are thinking about expanding internationally BUT all your materials are in English. How would you take on this challenge? How do you translate your materials and adapt them to cultures you barely know? Localization is your solution. A few decades ago, “localization” started to become more widely known. In the late 1970s, independent translators joined forces and formed companies in order to offer more diverse language services such as editing, proofreading and typesetting. Recently, the translation industry started to embrace technologies like translation memory to improve services. As a result, localization took off. The Cambridge dictionary defines localization as “the process of making a product or service more suitable for a particular country, culture, or area”. In other words, idiomatic translation is just one of the services within localization. Adapting graphics to the target markets, customizing content, converting to local currencies, using proper formats for dates and time zones are other examples of localization. Many statistics illustrate the benefits of localization in every industry. A few examples: 1. Studies have shown that consumers are five times more likely to purchase goods and services when they are offered in their own language. More than 60 percent of the consumers in France and Japan declared that they purchase only from websites where the information is presented in their own language. 2. According to research conducted by Common Sense Advisory, companies that localize information...

Growing Business through Translation and Localization

Less than five years ago many businesses were skeptical about social media. Nowadays, the question What doors would a Twitter account open for my business? Seems awfully old-fashioned. We’ve learned a valuable lesson: It’s always a good idea to get somewhere before your customers do. Time to move on to the next question: What doors would translating content into other languages open for my business? You never know whether you’ve missed out on business because your content was only available in English. The first step is to determine which languages make sense for your business. There is no need to translate your website or marketing campaigns into Danish if there isn’t any link between your brand and Denmark. Read our blog about the most important online languages. Even if you end up translating into Spanish only, you’ve opened up your content to more than 400 million native speakers. Second, make sure that you get it right. There is nothing more humiliating than a terrible translation of the text that you took so much time and effort to create. Enlist a translation agency with marketing, advertising, social media and online content expertise. Choose an agency that translates to and from any language, so that it’s easier if you should decide to add more languages later. Pick a translation agency that knows how to make SEO-friendly translations. Read our tips about localizing your content. Finally, don’t worry about the consequences. Yes, people may assume that since your website is in German, you offer fulltime German-speaking customer service – although you don’t. But translating your content isn’t about that. It’s about trust and...

Why Transliteration?

In a globalizing digital market, transliteration is an upcoming service. As a company you can realize growth by providing online content, products or applications in multiple languages through the Internet. These translation and localization projects focused in our region mainly on Western European languages. There’s no transliteration needed in those language pairs. Organizations with specific geographical focus already translate to ‘exotic’ languages with different alphabets. However, I predict this will become more mainstream, also for companies without ties in these language regions. And why not go into these markets? Imagine, in China there are 568 million Internet users and in comparison – 254 million in the US. Website translations to, for example, Chinese, Korean, Russian or Arabic will be more common. The difference in alphabet, writing direction and larger cultural differences cause for more factors in translation work, such as transliteration. But what is transliteration? Here’s a common definition: “To write words or letters in the characters of another alphabet.” (Merriam-Webster) Our translators know the systems and methods that are created for transliteration, such as hanyu pinyin for Chinese. Also for Russian – using the Cyrillic alphabet – there’s a common system in place for Romanization, or the conversion to our Latin writing. The other way around can be trickier sometimes, especially with names. Your company name for example, or products, services, or even the names of certain people involved. These names do not exist in the writing of the target language and so you can choose to keep it in Latin writing or, if you really want to localize well, you can transliterate these names to the local...

Domain Choices for International Websites

How do you set up a well-structured multilingual website? This is question pops up frequently, but it’s difficult to answer. The truth is that there really is no right or wrong. That said, I have nevertheless seen a lot of businesses make the wrong choices. An important decision is which URL structure and domain name to choose. I will investigate this subject further in this blog. SEO SEO (search engine optimization) depends on multiple factors. Although these factors change continuously, one of the principle determinants for achieving a high position in the search results is still the URL and path name (everything behind the slash). Exact matches between the URL and the search term will always lead to higher rankings. But how do you use this information for a multilingual website? Do you decide on one domain name with translation pages behind the slash or do you use a separate domain name for every individual country? Below I will describe the aspects to take in account. Determine your target region Setting geographic parameters is important. In which countries and in how many languages do you want your website or web shop to be found? Once these have been specified, first thing you need to do is determine what regions you are targeting. In how many countries and what languages do you want your website or web shop to be found?  Once you have decided, you can determine how large your website needs to be and assess how you will structure your  international website. URL structure Your next important decision concerns the URL structure. Will you use ‘geo-targeting’ and set up...
AdWords Translation: Language and Location Settings

AdWords Translation: Language and Location Settings

‘AdWords translation’ does not simply refer to converting advertisements and keywords to a different language but also entails gearing the translation to the target location. Advertisement texts and keywords must be localized, which means that defining your exact target audience prior to getting started with the translation is essential. Once you have defined the target audience and translated the AdWords, the work is by no means completed. You still need to notify Google of who your new target audience is! How Google determines the user location and language In order to show your advertisements only to those people relevant to you, Google identifies the location and language of the users. Google employs four factors in determining the language appropriate a specific user. Domain extension Is the user on Google.nl, Google.fr or Google.pt? Interface language What default language has the user selected for the Google interface? Keyword What language is the keyword in? Ip address Google records the ip address of users and links this to a location. Set AdWords language & location Below is a step by step explanation of how to change the location and language settings of your translated campaigns in AdWords. Set language Log in to your AdWords account. Click on the ‘Campaigns’ tab Click the name of the campaign. Click on the ‘Settings’ tab. Click ‘Edit’ next to ‘Languages’. Select target language or languages. Click ‘Save’ Set location Log in to your AdWords account. Click on the ‘Campaigns’ tab Click the name of the campaign. Click on the ‘Settings’ tab. Click ‘Edit’ next to ‘Locations’. This allows you to target not only a country, but...
Language Codes and Politeness in Different Cultures

Language Codes and Politeness in Different Cultures

In general, language is a means for people to communicate. But even when we translate accurately from one language to another, the message can be misunderstood – Manisha Somai pointed this out in her recent blog, Glocalization; think global, act local. This time, I will explain it through the different cultural concepts of politeness. To give you an example: when we want to introduce ourselves to another person, we may give our business card and say: ‘here you go’. In the Western culture you can simply lay your business card on the table and slide it to the other person. In The Netherlands, we once were asked to throw our business card in the air and pick up a random card from the ground, and look for the owner to start a conversation. In Chinese culture, it’s very rude when you don’t hold your business card with two hands, look at the other person and give them your card. You express yourself by presenting your business card. So, the phrase: ‘here’s my business card’ could be misinterpreted through body language or attitude. Both languages contain culture ‘codes’ about the message. Another example: in The Netherlands, when we say to a guest: ‘please eat something’, you may answer: ‘sorry, I don’t eat fish’, and it is accepted, the host may even say: ‘sorry I didn’t know you don’t eat fish’. In Taiwan, it can be very rude not to eat what your host is offering. You have to be brave and eat something even though you don’t like the food. Therefore, your reply to ‘eat something’ can be the difference between being...
Glocalization; Think Global, Act Local

Glocalization; Think Global, Act Local

A concept that is becoming increasingly important is glocalization. Still, a lot of people don’t know what glocalization is. Businesses should think global, and act local. If you think about it, it actually makes a lot of sense. What works in one country might not work in another. Companies don’t have just one marketing concept that works globally. Glocalization means that a product or service is distributed worldwide, but tailored or adapted to local preferences. This might have to do with culture, religion, lifestyle or other reasons that might affect the efficiency of a product or service. For example, if you look at McDonald’s, you know that they have a strong global position, with more than 34,000 restaurants. Even McDonald’s needs to adapt its menus to local wishes and preferences. Their hamburgers and fries are very popular, although in some countries the menus look completely different. In Morocco and other Islamic countries, McDonald’s has localized their menu by serving halal burgers. Recently, a friend told me that when his dad came to visit from Indonesia, they went to McDonald’s in Amsterdam. He ordered a meal with rice; not knowing that in the Netherlands McDonald’s does not serve rice. At Textcase, we focus on internationalization and we localize texts, making them appropriate for readers in other countries. When translating, we think global, but we localize stories for readers in other countries. By localizing texts, a lot of misinterpretations are prevented. When a global leader in household appliances, Electrolux, used the slogan ‘Nothing sucks like an Electrolux’, for their range of vacuum cleaners they probably haven’t thought about glocalization. Businesses must...

Translating Without Borders

One of the few obstacles to spreading information across the globe is language. Companies target customers but their message stops at the border. Readers enjoy books but most often only if a translation is available in their language. Textcase supports international initiatives spreading literature across cultures and continents. It is our goal to make information available in different countries, addressing readers in their native tongue. Some initiatives in translating without borders: In the United States, we admire the work of Open Letter, literary translations from the University of Rochester. Books from all over the world become available in English. The Translation and Publication Grant Program of Turkey has been successful in promoting Turkish writers abroad. In Germany, the Goethe Institut provides support for non-German publishers to translate German books into other languages. Many countries have a growing number of grant programs and international cooperation is essential. As a professional translation agency we try to keep in touch with them to offer translation services. If we work together, we can bring more of our stories to the other side of the...
Which Languages Matter Most Online?

Which Languages Matter Most Online?

While Europe and North America are still dealing with the financial crisis, almost everywhere else in the world the middle-class segment is growing. More middle-class households means more access to computers and mobile devices connected to the web. The more consumers of online information, the bigger the importance and value of translation and localization. Which languages are most present on the web right now? And which languages are most interesting for you to add to your company repertoire? In this month’s MultiLingual magazine we read that if you want to reach 80% of the world’s total online population, you need at least 12 languages. However, to address 90% of global online economic opportunity you need at least 13 languages. Please consult the table below to see which languages you should focus on. We at Textcase are eager to help out and are looking forward to receiving your inquiry.   Online population   Global online economic opportunity 1 Chinese 22.7% 1 English 36.3% 2 English 21.6% 2 Japanese 10.5% 3 Spanish 9% 3 German 8.4% 4 Japanese 4.5% 4 Spanish 7.8% 5 Portuguese 3.7% 5 French 6.2% 6 Arabic 3.6% 6 Chinese 6.1% 7 German 3.5% 7 Italian 3% 8 Russian 3.3% 8 Portuguese 2.5% 9 French 3.1% 9 Dutch 2.3% 10 Indonesian 1.9% 10 Korean 2.2% 11 Korean 1.8% 11 Arabic 2% 12 Italian 1.6% 12 Russian 2%   13 Swedish 1.2%...
Social Media Localization

Social Media Localization

New marketing strategies to engage with customers have led many companies to be active on social media. In traditional push marketing, the marketeer aims to be in control of all the interaction. Pull marketing seeks to understand what messages and content will meet an audience’s needs. Content is placed where the audience is already engaged and seeking information. Localizing social media content requires the use of native language speakers with knowledge of the local culture, trends and use of colloquial words and terms. All localized websites should lead to local social media, which emphasizes the importance of cohesion in language. At Localization World Conference we attended a session with representatives of database software giant SAP. They had a few interesting facts: In 2012 among Facebook’s top languages, those that saw the greatest rate of growth were Portuguese, Arabic, Spanish and French. Chinese is soon set to overtake English as the Internet’s most widely spoken language. In 2011, two-thirds (60%) of new Twitter accounts were registered outside the U.S. More than 50% of all the tweets per day were written in a language other than English. Large local social media platforms to keep an eye on: Orkut (Brazil), Nasza-Klaza (Poland), VKontakte and Odnoklassniki (Russia), Naver.com Café (South Korea), Baidu and QQ...
An Evolving Translation and Localization Industry

An Evolving Translation and Localization Industry

The need for content in multiple languages is rising in the business world. Shifts from print to online and mobile are accelerating and technological tools become more diverse and are growing in number. According to Common Sense Advisory the importance of quality content is high because we live in a world of heavy information consumption and sharing everything online. For a significant international organization, to reach your audience effectively, the norm is now shifting from 5 to 10 available languages towards 40 to 50 languages. Overall, good news for Textcase when we heard about many industry trends at the Localization World Conference in Paris earlier this week. To return to our pressing question of last week; this battle is still undecided. However, it seems like in the upcoming years all involved parties will have enough space to survive. The buyers of translation services are also fighting an internal battle. Some marketeers want to use more and more automated translation tools for speed. Engagement with the client, fast communication and acquiring an understanding of the market becomes more and more important. On the other hand, there are the strategic marketeers that are more hung up on the big picture, high quality and carrying out one consistent...
Who Gets Paid for Translation and Localization in 2020?

Who Gets Paid for Translation and Localization in 2020?

Next week, Textcase will be attending the Localization World Conference in Paris. This is a leading three day event focussing on new tools, methods and business practices in the areas of translation, localization and internationalization. The conference rooms, booths and network areas of Palais des congrès de Paris will be crowded with participants from the technology/online sector and our own competitors, the language service providers. The conference program this year is geared towards localization in the medical field, but also booming arenas such as video games and mobile apps. There are sessions discussing Twitter’s organic translation model and lots of attention towards developments in translation automation. At one of the seminars an interesting question is posed: Who gets paid for translation and localization in 2020? Translators. Not the translation companies. Machines. Those who develop the engines. Nobody. It’s free, but paid for through taxes. Google, Baidu, Microsoft, Yandex, Facebook. Paid for through advertising. Nothing changes. LSPs will see their business grow. Other ideas? At Textcase we are obviously hoping for answer five, however to think that nothing will change is unrealistic in our dynamic market. We are ready to adapt as well as pioneer. This upcoming week will be insightful; we will keep you up to...

Web Store Translation

Since 2010 Textcase has seen a considerable increase in the demand for web store translation, mostly into German, French and English. Product descriptions should be perfectly worded in order to inform, inspire and to convince the customer to buy the product. Web store texts are written with care and should, therefore, be translated with care. We have gained valuable experience in web store translation, whether the main product is a Mediterranean vacation home, trendy clothing, lightning or fun cooking utensils. Our translators understand that the product description is an important addition to the photo. The customer sees what the product looks like but wants to read about the material, how it would fit into their daily life and when and how it could be used. This has to be a vivid description. Most product descriptions in web stores are SEO friendly with short, clear sentences and excellent word choices. In other languages this has to come across just as well as in the source language. Our native speakers localize the texts in such a way that the products are elegantly described and presented in every language. Read more about our experience in web store translation. Are you thinking about outsourcing your web store translation project? Download our free white paper How to Outsource Translation and Localization Projects …Or contact us to request a free...
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