Google Skipped Persian Classes

Sadly, our beloved US Market intern Shabnam is leaving Textcase. After 6 months of hard work, she’ll continue to finish her degree at university. Since she is originally from Iran, I wanted to say good bye in her mother language: Persian. However, instead of asking one of our own translators, I decided to take Google Translate for a spin. Even though Textcase is an official Google Partner thanks to our excellence in Google AdWords, we would never recommend any company to translate their website, documents or mobile application using Google Translate. To support this statement, let’s go back to my little conversion with Shabnam. As I said, I wanted to say good bye to Shabnam. The exact sentence I formulated was ‘see you later’. Since I didn’t want to be too hard on Google, I changed the expression to a full sentence. What I eventually fed into Google’s machine was ‘I will see you later’. It resulted into the following: من شما را بعدا مراجعه کنید Happy as a child that just learned his first word, I showed the above to Shabnam. As soon as she started to laugh I knew what happened. The Persian sentence provided by Google didn’t make any sense at all: “I you come back later” The ‘come back later’ part is even considered to be a formal way of dismissing someone who interrupts you while you’re on the phone. So Google has a hard time translating this basic and actually very common phrase. However, maybe I confused Google by providing a full sentence, while I should have stuck with the shorter expression: ‘see you’. Unsurprisingly,...
Textcase Improves Translation Process with MemSource Cloud

Textcase Improves Translation Process with MemSource Cloud

At Textcase, the human factor is always an integral part of translating. Our translators are not only highly qualified, but are also experienced native speakers. Their linguistic expertise, knowledge and intelligence surpass every technological accomplishment in this sector of industry, including MemSource technologies. Nevertheless, the development of translation tools into support systems in the translation process is proving interesting to translation agencies. Translation tools are available in a number of varying versions. New disciplines such as post-editing are becoming mainstream concepts. Last summer, Textcase carried out extensive research into translation tools. There’s a great deal of information available on the internet, of course, but we were invited to spend some time at TAUS  and visited the SDL exhibition among others. We also participated in webinars and hosted a number of account managers. Through these various activities, we discovered that, for Textcase, MemSource provides the most attractive solution for the advancement of our quality and workflow. MemSource, the translation tool of choice for Textcase, offers the possibility of conducting the entire translation process in the cloud. Translators and editors are able to log in via personal accounts. Here, they receive an overview of their assigned tasks and have access to a local- and web-editor. Why MemSource benefits Textcase: • rapid analysis of the word count no matter the format. • clear-cut translation of web file formats without formatting codes. • suggestions from machine translation tool ‘Microsoft with feedback’ can be activated or deactivated. • rapid implementation of repeated terms and fragments. • simple to use for translators and project managers. Textcase has also implemented a translation memory that files by topic and client based on...
The Fine Art of Post-Editing

The Fine Art of Post-Editing

Everyone is familiar with it. Google Translate. A free translation software often used to determine the meaning of an unknown word in another natural language. Translating entire texts using a method as this will often cause consternation in most people: “That’s not possible with a machine! Machine translation is much too literal ”. This is true to some extent. A machine will simply translate the texts a word at a time without taking into consideration their context. This is where the fine art of post-editing comes into its own. What is post-editing? Post-editing is a term that’s, perhaps, unfamiliar to many. However, it merely refers to the revision (after it has been translated) of a text. The term ‘post-editing’ is usually applied when editing machine translated texts. This is in contrast to the term ‘editing,’ which is applied to the revision of texts that have been translated by an individual. Machine translation is increasingly being utilized as a tool to assist human translators. It introduces a whole new way of editing. Machine translated texts are often distorted whereby the original meaning of the text becomes lost. The post-editor is responsible for restoring the meaning lost in translation. The benefits of post-editing? Post-editing can be sub-divided into two distinctive forms. A text can be translated purely with the essence of the story in mind or it should be of a quality that doesn’t suggest the text is machine translated. The danger of post-editing is that an editor can become too focused on the translation and lose sight of the original context. An important question here is “why use machine translation?”...
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