Translator Reviews

Translator Reviews

Translator reviews are important for any translation agency. The translation business can be a bit messy: anyone can start an agency and anyone can become a translator. Ratings and reviews on websites, therefore, are more important than ever. On the most popular translation community, www.proz.com, translators have rated Textcase over the years and we’re proud to have a 4.8 out of 5 score! See our rating here. The Proz Blueboard has long been the place to go for translators to share their experiences about the agencies they cooperate with. At Textcase, we are looking for close and longterm relationships with translators, editors, copy writers, online marketers and other international communication professionals, even though they may live in faraway countries. Our project managers are connecting everyday with people who are passionate about translation and localization. At Textcase we believe that personal connections are important. Some professionals have been working with our company for more than 15 years – that’s something we’re proud of and we appreciate the dedication of our freelance colleagues to both the translation profession and our...
Find the Right Translator

Find the Right Translator

When you have a translation project, how do you select the right translator or language service provider? How do you make sure the quality matches your standard and how can you check the quality if you can’t read the language? Many marketing and communications professionals struggle with outsourcing translations. They often enlist the help of multilingual colleagues, either in their office or overseas, or they enter bits into Google Translate and see if there’s somewhat of a match in meaning. Materials like press releases, product descriptions for webshops, AdWords campaigns or SEO texts need to be top-notch. It is essential that the translator understands what you need, that he or she understands the culture of both the source and the target language and has excellent linguistic and communicative skills. Finding the right translator is easier said than done. Everyone can decide to start working as a translator tomorrow and the vague certifications in the industry provide few guarantees. On top of that, many scammers are pretending to be translators: they steal the identities of real translators and offer their services via fake e-mail addresses. Everyday I meet translators from all over the world, in almost any language combination. It is a wonderful part of my job as I get to talk to them about anything from their business to their newborns. We connect via LinkedIn, networking groups, translator communities, Skype, Gchat, our website, e-mail and face-to-face at events or at our office. I can distinguish professional applications from unprofessional ones and I have specific tests to assess linguistic knowledge. Also, I get to know everyone’s hobbies, interests and areas...
Making or Breaking a Translation

Making or Breaking a Translation

Translating is a lot like walking a tightrope. When you finally find your balance, you can take a few steady steps in the right direction. Still, you always have to stay focused and make sure not to fall. You can either do really well or fail miserably. Our worldwide network of translators consists of linguists who have passed the ‘Textcase test’. This test consists of a short text that can be translated in an infinite amount of ways. It’s a creative text with multiple layers and pitfalls. I’ve read more than a hundred English-Dutch translations and every single one is unique. (Read this article in Dutch here and in German here) What makes for a good translation? In this article, I will go into the three main identifiable aspects, in order of importance: accuracy, readability and style. 1. A translation must be accurate. This means that the message needs to be conveyed fully, without any omissions or additions or changes to the meaning. In order to do so, a translator must have a profound understanding of the cultures of both the source language and the target language. Examples of challenges: – Cultural subtleties, such as slang, dialects, stereotypes and figurative speech. We use language as a means to manipulate and work with our environment and circumstances. Since both the environment and the people are different in every region, language has borders. Translator Antony Shugaar described this issue beautifully in The New York Times Opinionator last week: “People talk about untranslatable words, but in a way, there’s no such thing. It may take three words, or an entire sentence, or...
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